Archive for May, 2017

Excerpt: Trump’s popularity can be apprehended through the lens of settler colonialism, which relies on various technologies, including racism and heteropatriarchy, to accomplish its aims.


Abstract: This thesis delves into two ‘edge areas’ located in and around East Jerusalem. It attempts to unfold and analyze the dynamics in these edge areas, while investigating the agency of the people present there through their own perceptions and practices towards the land, the urbanization processes, the power circulation and the structural impositions. Squeezed by […]


Excerpt: Suzan Shown Harjo, editor and multiple essay contributor to Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, describes in the book’s introduction the experiences of her great-grandparents, “Thunderbird or Nonoma’ohtsevehtse (Richard Davis), and Nellie Aspenal,” as new “hostage-students” of the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania in 1879.1 After travelling half a continent by train, “[w]hen they […]


Abstract: Over the past several decades, anthropologists and historians have recognized the diversity and fluidity of the cultural interactions in the Great Lakes region during colonization and settlement. These studies have focused either on the social processes of Indigenization, assimilation, or acculturation on the part of Indigenous communities, or the incorporation of Indigenous political alliances into European colonization. However, little […]


Abstract: This article examines Alaska Native citizenship, civil rights, land, and sovereignty in territorial Alaska from the Indian Reorganization Act to Termination. I argue that during this key shift in Indian policy, territorial and federal officials, lawmakers, and corporate interests wielded the rhetoric of citizenship, equal rights, and “reverse discrimination” as tools of dispossession against Alaska […]


Excerpt: How are Indigenous and settler relationships structured, and how is conflict addressed? In settler-colonial societies, complex patterns exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities who share the same territory, but whose relationships have been characterized by harm and violence. This violence is not just a matter of history,1 but exists for as long as the Indigenous […]


Abstract: By exploring the themes of settler colonialism and modernity in Australian commentary about Italy’s invasion of Abyssinia in 1935, this paper sets out to consider Italy’s war in north Africa as an international crisis with significance for Australian progressive narratives about Aboriginal conditions, status and rights important to Australia’s international reputation. Thus, Australia’s role as […]


Abstract: This research examines two contemporary Alaskan works of literature: Eowyn Ivey’s The Snow Child and Don Rearden’s The Raven’s Gift. I have engaged with (post) colonial theoretical frameworks to describe the settler colonial dynamics at work in each text. By comparing these two works I find that each narrative seeks autochthonous belonging for settler colonial protagonists, which is […]


Abstract:  Field nurses, primarily white women, encountered diverse cultures when they arrived on reservations in the American West between 1924 and 1955. Diseases were rampant, and many Native Americans had little knowledge of so-called modern medicine, frequently relying upon a combination of natural and spiritual remedies associated with various Indigenous traditions. White field nurses witnessed firsthand the devastating impact numerous […]


Description: This book unveils an ignored aspect of the Brazilian history: how the colonization of the country shaped the sexuality of its indigenous population. Based on textual research, the authors show how the government and religious institutions gradually imposed the family model considered as “normal” to Brazilian indigenous gays through forced labor, punishment, marriages with non-indigenous […]